Event Title

Senior Class ‘21 Studio Art Majors

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Start Date

8-5-2021 3:20 PM

End Date

8-5-2021 4:05 PM

Description

Senior Class ‘21 Studio Art Majors (Faculty Sponsors: Andrea Martens & Mary Zompetti)

This panel will be in conjunction with the Senior Art Majors Exhibition that will be on display in the Eleanor D. Wilson Museum in May. Each senior works in a chosen medium of concentration, and developed a body of work for their show. The media represented this year are painting, printmaking, drawing, and ceramics. The seniors worked with faculty in Fall 2020 to develop their studio practice and visual work, as well as research artist references and further refine their ideas.

Milo Bowles: The artist's work in drawing and printmaking relies on light and shadow and how they intersect in interesting ways, exploring spiritual undertones. The exhibition will include 6-12 lithographs, each 11" by 15" in scale.

Candice Housden: The artist's project includes 5-8 monotype prints, each print size 11" x 15," unframed. Within the prints, witness a conversation about vulnerability and taking up space through self-portraits. To do so, she creates context through directional and somewhat linear shapes that appear within the faces of her self-portraits.

Taylor Kate: The artist utilizes dramatic perspective and multiple planes to depict a layered void space out of charcoal and acrylic gouache. The mediums combined allow them to work vigorously with the focus on emotive color as they interpret their mindscape into linear space. This body of work belongs to the intersections of memories, dreams, and desires. She works to better understand that their perception of the past and of the future exist only in the present moment and to know intimately that it is so.

Kate Lydon: Farm animals are not what immediately come to mind when one thinks of threatened or critically endangered species. Through this series, the artist hopes to raise awareness of the conservation status of a few of the many livestock breeds that have been pushed to the brink of extinction by the artificial selection of industrial agriculture. The five to seven pieces are trace monotypes printed in blue and red, reminiscent of the red reveal hidden message puzzles enjoyed as a kid; with the idea that these pieces do stand alone, but also have a deeper meaning should one have the proper lens with which to view them.

Shanna L. Wallingford: The artist explores oil-painted self-portraits as self-reflections. The circular frame of her pieces is not just a material to paint on, but it acts as a node in a web of other nodes that is her conscious mind. The first step of the process is stretching the canvas through an embroidery hoop. The frame offers a sense of homeliness and tension.

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May 8th, 3:20 PM May 8th, 4:05 PM

Senior Class ‘21 Studio Art Majors

https://hollins.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_kjbeNnO_Tpu0xoooWOVdWw

Senior Class ‘21 Studio Art Majors (Faculty Sponsors: Andrea Martens & Mary Zompetti)

This panel will be in conjunction with the Senior Art Majors Exhibition that will be on display in the Eleanor D. Wilson Museum in May. Each senior works in a chosen medium of concentration, and developed a body of work for their show. The media represented this year are painting, printmaking, drawing, and ceramics. The seniors worked with faculty in Fall 2020 to develop their studio practice and visual work, as well as research artist references and further refine their ideas.

Milo Bowles: The artist's work in drawing and printmaking relies on light and shadow and how they intersect in interesting ways, exploring spiritual undertones. The exhibition will include 6-12 lithographs, each 11" by 15" in scale.

Candice Housden: The artist's project includes 5-8 monotype prints, each print size 11" x 15," unframed. Within the prints, witness a conversation about vulnerability and taking up space through self-portraits. To do so, she creates context through directional and somewhat linear shapes that appear within the faces of her self-portraits.

Taylor Kate: The artist utilizes dramatic perspective and multiple planes to depict a layered void space out of charcoal and acrylic gouache. The mediums combined allow them to work vigorously with the focus on emotive color as they interpret their mindscape into linear space. This body of work belongs to the intersections of memories, dreams, and desires. She works to better understand that their perception of the past and of the future exist only in the present moment and to know intimately that it is so.

Kate Lydon: Farm animals are not what immediately come to mind when one thinks of threatened or critically endangered species. Through this series, the artist hopes to raise awareness of the conservation status of a few of the many livestock breeds that have been pushed to the brink of extinction by the artificial selection of industrial agriculture. The five to seven pieces are trace monotypes printed in blue and red, reminiscent of the red reveal hidden message puzzles enjoyed as a kid; with the idea that these pieces do stand alone, but also have a deeper meaning should one have the proper lens with which to view them.

Shanna L. Wallingford: The artist explores oil-painted self-portraits as self-reflections. The circular frame of her pieces is not just a material to paint on, but it acts as a node in a web of other nodes that is her conscious mind. The first step of the process is stretching the canvas through an embroidery hoop. The frame offers a sense of homeliness and tension.