Event Title

The Intersection of Art, Literature, and Technology

Start Date

8-5-2021 2:35 PM

End Date

8-5-2021 3:10 PM

Description

The Intersection of Art, Literature, and Technology (speakers in order of appearance)

Averi Greenstreet '21 “The Art of a Scythe Series and the Dystopian Genre” (Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Rosen)

Beginning with explaining the dystopian curve, this presentation will detail how the Arc of a Scythe (2016-2019) series changes and supports dystopian fiction, as well as the many unique writing facets of Neil Shusterman's style, such as the artful use of "temporary protagonist" and the embodiment of "protagonism." Many dystopian stories and series begin at a specific societal point, but Arc of a Scythe captures the events and people leading up to suspension in a dystopian state, where series like The Hunger Games (2008-2010) and Divergent (2011-2013) begin. This series also features a form of artificial intelligence unlike any other represented in the genre, a sentient cloud known as the Thunderhead, which manifests as a character rather than a piece of technology. Finally, the presenter will discuss the possible future and longevity of Arc of a Scythe on these qualifications.

Marie Gruver '24 “Alfred Sisley: The French Industrial Revolution and its Effect on Impressionist Art” (Faculty Sponsor: Genevieve Hendricks)

Throughout the 19th century, all aspects of life were experiencing an unprecedented revolution. Technology and innovation were rapidly changing, impacting the very fabric that tied together the art world. This phenomenon has since been labeled the Industrial Revolution, a time where the very way people expressed themselves, connected with one another, and even lived their own lives was quickly evolving. It is therefore no coincidence that the revolutionary French Impressionist Movement was centered right in the middle of it. Alfred Sisley was one of the most prominent out of these Impressionists, based on his rendition of the French countryside. This time period of technological, societal, and environmental change is clearly evident in Sisley's works throughout his career. This project details Sisley's artistic evolution in line with the movement through six of his most notable works that span the length of time of 40 years and will explore the influence that the French Industrial Revolution had on Impressionism, but more closely, on the life and career of Alfred Sisley.

Tate Hurley '21 “Tarsila do Amaral: The Queen of Modern Brazilian Art” (Faculty Sponsor: Genevieve Hendricks)

In early 20th century Latin America, the work of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral was essential to the development of the modern art scene. She and her fellow Brazilian artists created a type of edgy and provocative work that was able to take off in Latino culture. The climate of Brazil at the time of Tarsila's creative upbringing was extremely conservative and restrictive of cultural representation. Therefore, she studied abroad, where she learned the techniques needed to escape this view of caution and promote radical change not only in the fine art realm, but in the political one, as well. This urban mindset allowed for sub-cultures and traditions of Brazilian society to be showcased to a larger audience. The evolution of the art movements Pau-Brasil and Antrpofagia she established with the help of the infamous "Grupo dos Cinco" pushed the boundaries of past art techniques through the use of avant-garde practices. Because of this unique movement, Brazilian culture was showcased in the truest form, as Amerindian and Afro-Brazilian values were finally normalized and incorporated into society. Over time, her efforts ultimately led to the complete transformation of the Latin artscape and provided minority communities with a venue to express their traditions.

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May 8th, 2:35 PM May 8th, 3:10 PM

The Intersection of Art, Literature, and Technology

https://hollins.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_kukODx33SVOq4OnKDroZsw

The Intersection of Art, Literature, and Technology (speakers in order of appearance)

Averi Greenstreet '21 “The Art of a Scythe Series and the Dystopian Genre” (Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Rosen)

Beginning with explaining the dystopian curve, this presentation will detail how the Arc of a Scythe (2016-2019) series changes and supports dystopian fiction, as well as the many unique writing facets of Neil Shusterman's style, such as the artful use of "temporary protagonist" and the embodiment of "protagonism." Many dystopian stories and series begin at a specific societal point, but Arc of a Scythe captures the events and people leading up to suspension in a dystopian state, where series like The Hunger Games (2008-2010) and Divergent (2011-2013) begin. This series also features a form of artificial intelligence unlike any other represented in the genre, a sentient cloud known as the Thunderhead, which manifests as a character rather than a piece of technology. Finally, the presenter will discuss the possible future and longevity of Arc of a Scythe on these qualifications.

Marie Gruver '24 “Alfred Sisley: The French Industrial Revolution and its Effect on Impressionist Art” (Faculty Sponsor: Genevieve Hendricks)

Throughout the 19th century, all aspects of life were experiencing an unprecedented revolution. Technology and innovation were rapidly changing, impacting the very fabric that tied together the art world. This phenomenon has since been labeled the Industrial Revolution, a time where the very way people expressed themselves, connected with one another, and even lived their own lives was quickly evolving. It is therefore no coincidence that the revolutionary French Impressionist Movement was centered right in the middle of it. Alfred Sisley was one of the most prominent out of these Impressionists, based on his rendition of the French countryside. This time period of technological, societal, and environmental change is clearly evident in Sisley's works throughout his career. This project details Sisley's artistic evolution in line with the movement through six of his most notable works that span the length of time of 40 years and will explore the influence that the French Industrial Revolution had on Impressionism, but more closely, on the life and career of Alfred Sisley.

Tate Hurley '21 “Tarsila do Amaral: The Queen of Modern Brazilian Art” (Faculty Sponsor: Genevieve Hendricks)

In early 20th century Latin America, the work of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral was essential to the development of the modern art scene. She and her fellow Brazilian artists created a type of edgy and provocative work that was able to take off in Latino culture. The climate of Brazil at the time of Tarsila's creative upbringing was extremely conservative and restrictive of cultural representation. Therefore, she studied abroad, where she learned the techniques needed to escape this view of caution and promote radical change not only in the fine art realm, but in the political one, as well. This urban mindset allowed for sub-cultures and traditions of Brazilian society to be showcased to a larger audience. The evolution of the art movements Pau-Brasil and Antrpofagia she established with the help of the infamous "Grupo dos Cinco" pushed the boundaries of past art techniques through the use of avant-garde practices. Because of this unique movement, Brazilian culture was showcased in the truest form, as Amerindian and Afro-Brazilian values were finally normalized and incorporated into society. Over time, her efforts ultimately led to the complete transformation of the Latin artscape and provided minority communities with a venue to express their traditions.